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Sunday, April 15, 2007

Blowtorch by Jesse "Cadre" Hansen colored by Szerian


Here is a piece of artwork done by Jesse "Cadre" Hansen that he allowed me to color. It took me about a total of 3 hours since it's been about 6 months since I have colored anything. I hope I did your work justice Cadre! Thanks for the opportunity!


Co-Author Curt Combs - Szerian

8 comments:

Jesse "Cadre" Hansen said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jesse "Cadre" Hansen said...

I'm humbly honored you chose a piece to color... lol... surprised at the choice... mind if I show Alfred Paige? He's the creator of the character and was the one that asked if I could ink this along with a number of others for him.

I think he'd be tickled pink.

Jesse "Cadre" Hansen said...

critique forthcoming... just gotta make time to do so

Caanan - Guild Commander: said...

Szerian, this look very good, considering you havn't colored in a while. What I like most are the metal parts - particularlt the tendrals that connect to the gun. Those are the most solid. That's not easy to color metal. From what I can see, you need to just practice blending the light-to-darks a little smoother. We talked about the smoke and how to address that. Use the links to man so see how others apply various techniques to accomplish colors.

be blessed man

EraserX said...

OK, here goes with the critique. First off, the biggest problem I notice is that your shading with plain lighter and darker versions of your base tones. It's a really unnatural way to go and sticks out like a sore thumb. Nearly every image has atleast two things that should bring the entire piece together and keep it from clashing. The first thing is called ambient lighting. Put simply, this is the light that exists where no others do. This is the color that bleads into your shadowed areas. A generic catch-all would be a cool color like blue-grey that will help make your shadowed areas recede. The second thing to always remember is the color of the primary light source in the scene. It will always have some kind of effect on your light tones and possibly the mids as well. If you do these two things, you'll get a much more natural appearance with your color choices. And once you get the hang of it, you can go crazy and break all the rules you want.

The next thing I noticed about your work is that the application is splotchy. Coloring and drawing have a lot in common and being good at one will help you with the other. One example of this is how more experienced artists have learned to use their arm to make strokes instead of just their wrist. The reason is to make sure lines flow smoothly without kinks, shakiness. This will help in your coloring as well. If you're working with a mouse, you're at a disadvantage, but you can still try to make sure your shading has a nice soft flow to it. Don't feel like you have to use one brush for everything either. Sometimes you can, but some brushes just aren't suited for it. For example, your smoke is rendered as hard as the highlights on the metal. That's not very accurate.

Another thing to make sure you check for is staying in the lines. I won't get into it because I'm sure you know how and it was probably just a mistake, but there are multiple places where your colors either don't extend underneath the lines or they bleed outside of them. Zoom in more if you need to. There are some things you can get away with without the average person knowing, staying in the lines is not one of those things.

Lastly, lens flares. Honestly, my suggestion is to either stay away from them entirely or study enough photography to know when you might actually see one. One general rule is that you will never ever see more than one lensflare on an image, due to the curvature of the camera lens it's reflecting off of and the sheer amount of light needed to actually cause the effect. I kind of covered this point already, but really think about how much light it takes to cause a lens flare. You would have to be staring directly at the sun or into a very bright light. In many instances, the sun wouldn't even be enough and reflected light off of metal or another shiny object usually isn't either. That's not to say objects can't reflect enough light to cause a glow or shine the bleads outside the lined area. This is not an effect caused by a lens, but simply a good deal of light reflecting off a shiny object and hitting particles in the air causing the glow you see. The more moisture in the air, the more this will happen. In a regular scene, try to keep this kind of thing concentrated only to the shiniest bits on the page and don't let it bleed all over unless the piece specifically calls for that to be a focal point of the scene, which usually isn't the case.

Anyways, I hope all this helps. I'll try to get in here and critique more of your coloring when you post it.

-John

Szerian said...

Thanks John! Your's is the most honest and usable critique I have ever gotten. I am still getting used to light sources and such so your info is invaluable to me. I will definitely try to work on everything you pointed out cause I really do wanna be the best colorist I can be. Thanks a great heap for the critique!

Jesse "Cadre" Hansen said...

well... no need for mine then... he hit most of them... lol...

but one more thing... if ya do camo...make sure it's the same throughout...

ie: beret and pants... missed a shape on the beret... ;)

Szerian said...

I realized I missed the beret after I posted it. Sorry, Cadre!